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LGBTQ Connect

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In San Francisco, housing is the #1 unmet need of the HIV population, and the LGBT community is nearly two and a half times as likely to be homeless as the general population. The National AIDS Strategy has identified housing for people with HIV as a national priority, and, according to HUD, San Francisco ranks last in the nation in meeting the housing needs of people with HIV/AIDS.

  • According to the 2013 San Francisco Biennial Homeless Point In Time Count and Survey, which collected data on sexual orientation for the first time, nearly one-third (29%) of the San Francisco’s homeless identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
  • In July 2013, a report issued by the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force formed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, Addressing The Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco, found that 40% of LGBT older adults were living in poverty, compared to 30% of the general population, that 24% needed housing assistance, and two-thirds (66%) are concerned they will not be able to remain in their homes, yet 42% of housing assistance service users feel unsafe obtaining assistance as an LGBT person.
  • The LGBT Aging Policy Task Force and the federally mandated Ryan White CARE Council have both identified an emerging crisis need for rental subsidies to keep disabled seniors in their homes when their employer-sponsored long-term disability policies expire as they reach retirement age.
  • The HUD-mandated Analysis of Impediments to Access to Fair Housing identified a need for increased access to rental assistance to remove barriers to fair housing for senior and disabled individuals.

This data supports a needs-based increased investment in culturally competent homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing services targeting the LGBT community, today.


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San Francisco Doesn’t Need a New Jail

California’s prison and jail crisis continues to draw international attention as the state with the highest number of people living in cages has been found guilty of cruel and unusual punishment. The United States Supreme Court has ordered Governor Jerry Brown to reduce California’s prison population by tens of thousands by the end of 2013. Many of those effected come from our poorest communities, including people of color, communities experiencing high levels of unemployment and homelessness, and those already experiencing mental health and addiction challenges.

In response to this ruling, many of California’s prisoners are being transferred to local jurisdictions which research shows are better equipped to respond to rehabilitation needs since they are closer to inmates home communities and support networks. Rehabilitation can really only happen where support and resources exist. Continue reading


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People United, Never Defeated: Budget Victory

The past few years have been brutally cruel to the poorest San Franciscans. They have watched access to health care erode, school staffing slashed, and a whole host of specialized community programs shut their doors due to budget cuts. For homeless people, it has meant the loss of six drop-in centers and exhaustingly long waits for shelters. Over 3,000 people now wait in line every day at the Saint Anthony’s Foundation for lunch. The situation is tense for many struggling to make ends meet.

Six months ago, San Francisco’s budget forecast was grim. Facing an almost $400 million shortfall, the Human Service Agency proposed shutting down two drop-in centers for homeless people serving communities of color. Residential treatment programs were going to get slaughtered…public benefits slashed…supportive housing decimated. We expected the closing of after school programs and violence prevention programs galore. This, after years of reductions, meant the breaking point for services poor people depend on for survival.

The Coalition on Homelessness and community members came together to analyze impacts through the Budget Justice Collaborative in our struggle to stave off reductions. Work was done to figure out what reductions could be absorbed without harming poor people. Community and labor worked together to come up with a host of alternative revenue ideas.

Luckily for the destitute of San Francisco, Newsom was gone. Interim Mayor Ed Lee held a community process, and actually listened. He prioritized safety net programs. He asked Fire, Police, and the nurses to give up their raises. The city garnered more sales tax than expected.

By the time the budget came to the Board of Supervisors, there was about $8 million left to come up with to stave off reductions to poor people. In addition, there was about $9 million in other items Board members wanted to fund, from capital projects…to halting privatization of security guards…to new Police Academy class…to trees. A year ago, the Board would have had to make up about $15 million instead. The Board accepted about $11 million in recommendations from Budget Analyst Harvey Rose, who identified wasteful spending. What the Board reduces, the Board can replace with other items. There was some other revenue as well, and it added up pretty well close to balancing out with all parties satisfied.

When it came to the end of the process, however, the consensus building that came out of the Mayor’s Office started to fall apart. Apparently, Chief of Staff Steve Kawa (a holdover from the Newsom years) did not get the memo that this was the new era of getting along. The office insisted, even though they had the funding, that they were going to contract out. This put many Board members in an awkward spot, since they would like to have the future support of labor unions, and would never get it if they contracted out. In the end, even though the Mayor’s Office had funding to cover it all, they still had to cut a bunch of stuff out of the budget. There was a transparent effort to pit the non-profits against the unions. However, since most non-profits are now unionized, this made divisiveness hard to manufacture.

When the budget finally balanced at 3am the morning after the last day of June, there were no cuts to supportive housing, no cuts to job training, after-school programs, nor violence prevention. It would have felt better for everyone involved if political game playing had not occured, but overall, the most vulnerable San Franciscans were protected. There were a lot of community stakeholders that helped make this happen. Supervisor Jane Kim really stepped up and resisted a lot of pressure, and Supervisor Carmen Chu put aside her own personal priorities and tried to work collectively with folks. In the end, we have a city budget that all San Franciscans should be proud of: a budget that has integrity and principles infused throughout, and a budget that–while not perfect from any one perspective–can be, quite simply, named “fair.”


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Vision for an Equitable Budget

The City of San Francisco released a five-year budget plan as now required by voters. It was more than a bit disturbing. Here I was thinking that the recession is over, city coffers would become flush again. The heart break and travesty our community has endured with multiple years of budget blood spatter, the closure of so many shelters, drop-in centers, treatment programs, cuts to disability, In-Home-Support Services, supportive housing has certainly caused a whole lot of pain. Literally. Whether it is longer waits for a disabled elder to get off the streets, or disease caused by lack of access to water, or back pains from sleeping on the cold concrete. Painful as in losing an after school program or a childcare slot for your child while you work, or having to leave your job to care for a parent who has Alzheimer’s and whose day treatment program shut down. It is pain. Painful as in losing your good city job.

What makes it most painful is that it never had to be this way. There are a myriad of ways the budget could be solved. At the state level, many of us remember when Proposition 13 passed – sports almost immediately disappeared from public schools. It has plagued the state ever since, as the major beneficiary has not been little old ladies as advertised by the tax Jarvis creeps, but corporations with large properties – properties that get taxed on the original value even after they merge with other large companies.

Here we have two plans we are presenting – one to solve the state budget crisis and the other to solve the local budget problem.

The State Budget Crisis:
Presented by California Tax Reform Association

The following summarizes 10 measures, which will spread the burden in a way, which arguably have a minimal impact on economic growth and recovery. These include eliminating new loopholes recently opened, taxing untaxed windfalls, ending tax breaks with no benefits, imposing taxes on the very rich, and increasing sin taxes. In addition, without adding to the current burden of taxes for the general public, the state could maintain some part of the previous increases for broader-based taxes, such as keeping the vehicle license fee increase and lowering the sales tax only 1⁄2 cent, rather than the expected 1 cent. Taken together, these continued taxes could avoid cuts, which are damaging to the recovery and to our future, and arguably would have little negative impact on economic recovery. Note: The revenues are not the same in every year, since some do not take effect until fiscal year 2011-12. The Legislative Analyst’s Office calls for a long-term workout, and these revenues would provide that. For a more complete explanation of tax options, surf to http://caltaxreform.org/?p=101.

PROPOSALS

1. Enact an Oil Severance Tax at 9.9% ($1.2 billion)
California is the only state, and the only place in the world, that does not tax oil production. 9.9% is the rate proposed by Governor Schwarzenegger. Contrary to oil industry claims, California has the lowest tax on oil in the nation—about 60 cents per barrel—when other states are at $6-$7 per barrel or more at current prices. This tax will have no effect on the price of gasoline or on oil production.
2. Eliminate Secret Corporate Tax Loopholes ($1.7 -2 billion)
Enacted in Recent Budget Agreements The Legislature passed new permanent corporate loopholes in secret—loss carry-backs, credit sharing, and an elective single-sales factor, that will all take effect in 2011. These are de-stabilizing and costly, and repealing them now would not increase any taxes. They are also egregious, giving multinational corporations the ability to manipulate the system to lower their tax burden.
3. Broaden Sales Tax Base to Include Untaxed Commodities ($2 billion or more)
There is virtually unanimous agreement that our sales tax base is too narrow. The Governor has supported broadening it, and the first steps should include taxes on entertainment, admissions, parking, golf and skiing, hotels (i.e., the temporary rental of space), and digital products—all of which are commodities easily subject to tax and would result in $2 billion. Beyond that, sales taxes on telecommunications, cable and satellite would generate an additional $2 billion. And beyond those, there are many services, which arguably should be taxed, for billions more.
4. Reinstate Top Income Tax Brackets to 11% ($4 billion)
The top 1% of earners earns an unprecedented 25% of income in California. While that may decrease due to the recession, the recovery of the stock market means capital gains for the wealthy are likely to recover, while ordinary incomes in a slow economy are not. State income taxes have no impact on the location of the wealthy or investment in California, and this revenue will grow faster than economic recovery.
5. Close Corporate Property Tax Loopholes ($2 billion)
Statutory definitions of change of ownership are thoroughly loophole-ridden. CTRA research has identified numerous cases where properties have not been reassessed at market value following a change in ownership. We estimate that tightening corporate property tax loopholes would raise $2 billion. The Legislature can act by statute to close this loophole.
6.
Maintain Vehicle License Fee (VLF) at 1% ($1.3 billion)
The VLF is supposed to be an in-lieu property tax, but was cut from 2% to .6%, then raised temporarily to the current rate of 1.15%. A long-term resolution of this issue would put the VLF at the Proposition 13 rate, 1%, beginning in FY 2011-12.

7. Close Useless Corporate Tax Loopholes ($1 billion)
Enterprise zones have been demonstrated to have no impact on jobs ($500 million). Avoidance of capital gains on commercial property sales—so-called like-kind exchanges—are driven by federal, not state considerations ($350 million). Placing offshore tax havens in the water’s edge stops blatant tax manipulation ($150 million). Impact on economic decisions: zero.
8. Increase Tobacco and Alcohol Taxes ($2.4 billion)
Taxing products with negative impacts on society has positive effects. Enacting a tax at 10 cents per alcoholic drink would generate $1.4 billion. Proposals to increase tobacco taxes have been estimated to generate $1 billion.
9. Improve Tax Collections ($1.5 billion initially, less ongoing)
Governor Schwarzenegger vetoed legislation which would have provided an initial $1.5 in improvements in collections, including withholding on independent contractors, tightening nexus (Amazon issue), and proposing a bank records match. That amount would fall as others, above, phase up.
10. Lower Current Sales Tax by 1⁄2 Cent ($2.5 billion)
The temporary 1-cent sales tax increase will expire July 2011. Extending—but lowering—the sales tax to 1⁄2 cent would grow revenues to $3 billion, particularly with a broader base. This could phase down by 1⁄4 cent/year as the state’s fiscal condition recovers. Many of these tax changes would have little or no negative economic impact, particularly when contrasted to a state unable to finance infrastructure, that allows its higher education system and schools to deteriorate, that forces cutbacks in local government, and that shreds its safety net for its poorest citizens.

San Francisco’s Budget Crisis
The popular rhetoric is that the pensions are bankrupting the city – the reality is that the city is paying more into the pensions because the banks screwed the working man – and the pensions stopped making money. Nonetheless the workers are giving back year after year, and the poorest of the poor are paying with their lives. Isn’t it time for everyone to share the pain?

In the City’s five year budget plan, by year 2015/16, they are planning on bringing in $100 million in unidentified additional revenue – but saving twice that, $200 million, on employment and pension costs. While it is difficult to imagine what else they would cut – the deficit, and the ensuing cuts to social services, don’t get any better over the next five years. For example, public documents demonstrate that public health has cut $33 million from health care over the past four years, and $32 million from mental health, substance abuse and homeless programs. We have lost 1/3 of our shelter beds and over ½ of our resource centers. The savings through budget cuts to city services range each year from $63 million to $87 million over the next five years according to the plan – for a total of $311 million in savings from reductions over the five year period. Ouch!

Platform For An Equitable City Budget

I.  Steps to Take Right Now:

~Change of Ownership- Collection on Existing Mergers/Acquisitions
Under Proposition 13, when a property changes hands, the property is reassessed and the taxes are based on the new purchase price. In addition, when property changes hands, the city collects a property transfer tax from the buyer – it is just tacked onto the purchase prices and folded into the loan. SEIU and the Revenue Coalition has been working to make sure that recent mergers have property reassessed – so far, we have forwarded names to the Assessors office that have led to new revenue for the city. These have included the JP Morgan/Chase merger, and the Blackton purchase of Hilton. Most recently, the Assessor has gotten lost revenue back from Jiffy Lube change of ownership as well. This work must continue as there are at least 25 more properties where change of ownership has occurred from which the city did not reassess or get transfer tax.

To stop this tax evasion from occurring in the future, we are recommending that a penalty be applied to companies who fail to report on a change of ownership or merge. This could be passed by legislation.

~Foreclosure Registry
Lots of folks don’t think foreclosures are a big problem in San Francisco. They are wrong, we have had a couple thousand and many are long time homeowners who put out seconds on their homes. Once the home is foreclosed upon, the deed passes to the bank. Unfortunately foreclosures are not being registered with the city, and we have no means to collect both the transfer tax and to reassess the property value.

One idea is to have a registry. Banks would have to register on every foreclosure and they would have to register again when the deed is passed onto another bank, and another. This will allow us to collect reassessed property taxes and transfer taxes EACH time the property changed hands. We also could include in this legislation rights for property owners who are losing their homes – rights that could protect them from the foreclosure.

~Property Tax Appeal Reform
Big corporations have no reason not to appeal their property tax assessments – it only costs them $60! The city is losing right now over $20 million in appeals to lower taxes. Bank of America just requested $4 million on 555 California properties and 1 Market requested $8 million. Appeals are almost always granted at least in part.

Legislation could be passed to create criteria for appeals on commercial property, and the city could assert fines and penalties for frivolous appeals. This could save the City and County of San Francisco millions.

~ Blight Ordinance Lots of big property owners simply leave their properties vacant instead of reducing rents on commercial properties. The result is boarded up buildings and public safety issues. The City could expand the blight ordinance fines to include boarded up $1,000 a day. Here at the Coalition on Homelessness, we are aware of quite a few empty large apartment and residential hotels that are sitting vacant. The fines would generate revenue, and hopefully bring rents down.

II.  For November 2011
~ Vacancy Parcel Tax
Vacant lots are often the result of land speculation, and ironically cause decreased property values and other problems for neighborhoods. One way to bring in revenue and to address this situation is to have a parcel tax specific to vacant lots. South of Market Community Action Network is pushing this proposal for the South of Market area.

~ Merger Transfer Tax
As Proposition 13 doesn’t count change of ownership on mergers, so localities miss out on a whole lot of income from property reassessments and transfer taxes. Our above proposal of a fine on not registering mergers would go a long ways in ensuring San Francisco gets all those transfer taxes, however a new idea is to pass a “merger” tax specific to mergers to capture some of that lost revenue. This could go on the November ballot and would not hurt everyday San Franciscans.

~Revenue Impact and Maximization Report
We need to know if San Francisco is collecting what is should be in revenue, and who is paying that bill. This initiative would force the city to look at disparities in tax burdens and where there is lost revenue. This could help all of us move forward for a more equitable budget.

III.  For November 2012
~Gross Receipts
San Francisco used to collect both gross receipts taxes (or profit tax) and payroll taxes. A lawsuit from 7 of the more powerful downtown interests changed that, and we ended up with a payroll tax. This is a regressive tax that hurts small business. If we changed to a gross receipts tax, that business that is pulling in the insane bucks would have to pay more. This would require voter approval and bring in an additional $30 to $60 million a year.

Conclusion:

Well there you have it. We don’t present a federal plan – just slash the military budget bring every impoverished American out of poverty, into decent housing with full stomachs to boot.

We can move forward with the vision of a thriving and just San Francisco, where all our citizenry is treated fairly and basic human rights to healthcare, housing and freedom from hunger are embraced.


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A Declaration of the Common People

By Andrew Jackson Kocher (A Common Homeless Man)

When, in the course of human events, it has become necessary for the Common People to dissolve the political commitments which have connected them with a centralized Federal Government, and to assume among the powers of the Earth the shape and spirit of a democracy which reflects the inalienable rights to which the laws of nature entitle them; a decent respect to the opinions of humanity requires that they should Declare the causes which impel them to make a charge of No Confidence.

We, The Common People, hold these truths to be self-evident, that all humanity is created equal, that they are endowed by their very existence with certain inalienable rights; and that among these are Life, Liberty, Access to the natural bounty of unspoiled land and the Fruits thereof;  Clean Air, Pure Water and the pursuit of happiness within a just and equal society.

To secure these rights, governments have been instituted over communities, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. The Common People maintain that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, by failing to uphold these rights, it is the moral obligation of the People to alter or abolish it and institute in its place a new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its obligations in such a form as to provide for environmentally sound interaction with the Biosphere Earth; and shall seem most likely to effect their safety, health and happiness.

Common sense will dictate that a government long established should not be changed for light and transient reasons and accordingly, experience shows that humankind are more disposed to suffer when corruption, pollution and other evils are bearable, than to correct the evil by abolishing the sources of the corruption and pollution to which they are accustomed.

But, when a long series of abuses, deceptions and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, exposes a design to reduce the Common People under absolute corporate despotism, it is our right and our moral obligation to reject such government and to provide a new form of government by the People to provide for our future security.

Such has been the patient sufferance of the Common People and such is now the necessity, which rallies them to separate themselves from the present Federal Government of the United States of America. The history of the present Federal government is one of repeated deception and usurpation, having in direct object the establishment of a corporate tyranny over the American population.

To demonstrate this, let the facts be submitted to a World in Peril.

Corporations, by their very nature, have no sense of national patriotism, and therefore cannot be loyal to any one people or political ideology. The only obligation of a multi-national corporation is to make profit. Therefore, they exist only to exploit the population of the Earth in the quest for ongoing profit.

We, the People, have been deprived of our inalienable rights.

The Federal Government has failed to represent the American people, either as individuals or en masse: as intended by the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights. We have learned that Free Trade does not guarantee individual freedoms and that Federal over-legislation provides the opportunity for Federal government to reach into the home or hovel of every common citizen.

We, The Common People, have been deprived of our inalienable right to the bounty of the natural world in the form of unspoiled lands, clean air and pure water.

The Federal government allows multi-national corporations to dominate and exploit the natural resources of America, and to restrict the access of Common citizens to the natural world, due to and as a result of, criminal exploitation of our environment. These same multi-national corporations continue to exploit the Common People through marketing experimentation and the quest for ongoing profit by establishing the complete dependency of the population on corporate production and distribution for the necessities of life.

The Federal government has employed deception and evasion in order to persuade the Common People to offer up their patriotism and progeny on the alter of corporate profit.

The Federal government promotes military aggression and the enhancement of a worldwide ideological struggle for dominion in order to create market opportunities for, and further promote the agenda of, multi-national corporations towards globalization of the world economy and the complete domination of the Common People.

We, therefore, the People of America, appealing to the judgment of the natural force of the universe for the moral righteousness of our intentions, do solemnly publish and Declare that the Common People are, and of right ought to be, free and independent people, that they are absolved from all allegiance to a Federal government dominated in policy by multi-national corporations, and that all political connection between the Common people and the Federal government is, and of right ought to be, totally dissolved, and that as a free and independent people, we have the power to reform our government, establish an ecologically sustainable and moral co-existence with the Biosphere Earth and the Human race, contract alliances, establish commerce, conduct peace, levy war and do all other acts and things which independent people of inalienable right do, and, for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our futures and our sacred Honor.


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Governor Brown’s Budget Cuts: Women’s Lives on the Chopping Block, What's wrong with the cuts and how to not make them

Governor Brown’s Budget Cuts: Women’s Lives on the Chopping Block
Sisters United Front for Survival

Citing California’s $26 billion shortfall, the state legislature on March 15 approved $9 billion in cuts to an already-frayed safety net. Hardest hit in the flood of reductions are women. Lawmakers justified their actions as painful but necessary. But, the truth is that in this economic crisis, as always, the state is supporting greed over need, sacrificing the most vulnerable while protecting massive business sub-sidies. It’s time to change priorities!

  • Balancing the budget on the backs of women and the disadvantaged

Most severely impacted is Cal-WORKs, which provides cash assis-tance and job training to the poor, most of whom are single mothers. Over 1,000 families in San Francisco would lose assistance in San Francisco and grants would be reduced by almost $100 a month. The loss of other services adds to the misery of women and the indigent. Hacked are medical programs, in-home care, mental health, early childhood and developmentally disabled services.
The state is also slashing the budgets of community colleges and the California State University system which serve workingclass students, a majority of whom are women. And, a campaign to vilify public workers and their hard-earned pensions threatens the well-being of those lucky enough to have jobs.

  • Switch the priorities: Tax the Rich and Corporations!

Welfare moms have long been a Republican target as a symbol of “Big Government.” But the hack-and-slash mayhem emanating from Sacramento now is Democrat-led. With the June special election eliminated, the Governor will be looking for ways to address the remaining deficit. More budget cuts are likely, possibly totaling as much as $12.5 billion. Once again, workers and the poor will pay and pay and pay. All this because neither party will call for big business to pay its fair share!
The deficit exists in large measure because corporations and banks are paying less and less into the system. Wealth is being transferred from the working class to the richest few.

  • It’s time to reverse the flow!
  • Enact an oil severance tax California, where Chevron is headquartered, is the only state in the entire world that doesn’t tax extraction (a 9.9% tax = $1.2 bil./yr.)
  • Close corporate tax loopholes ($3-5 bil./yr.)
  • Eliminate war expenditures (CA share = $14.5 bil./yr.). U.S. Out of Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya!
  • Reduce prison spending Release all women incarcerated for defending themselves and their children from their abusers; cancel the Three Strikes law.
  • Stop privatization and contracting out; use union labor ($34 bil./yr.)
  • Reinstate the top income tax bracket to 11% ($4 bil./yr.)

We demand the State restore social services regardless of immigration status; expand CalWORKs, provide childcare & job training!

Issued by: Sisters United Front for Survival (A project of Radical Women) 415-864-1278, baradicalwomen@earthlink.net, http://www.radicalwomen.org


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Governor Brown’s Budget Cuts: Women’s Lives on the Chopping Block, What’s wrong with the cuts and how to not make them

Governor Brown’s Budget Cuts: Women’s Lives on the Chopping Block
Sisters United Front for Survival

Citing California’s $26 billion shortfall, the state legislature on March 15 approved $9 billion in cuts to an already-frayed safety net. Hardest hit in the flood of reductions are women. Lawmakers justified their actions as painful but necessary. But, the truth is that in this economic crisis, as always, the state is supporting greed over need, sacrificing the most vulnerable while protecting massive business sub-sidies. It’s time to change priorities!

  • Balancing the budget on the backs of women and the disadvantaged

Most severely impacted is Cal-WORKs, which provides cash assis-tance and job training to the poor, most of whom are single mothers. Over 1,000 families in San Francisco would lose assistance in San Francisco and grants would be reduced by almost $100 a month. The loss of other services adds to the misery of women and the indigent. Hacked are medical programs, in-home care, mental health, early childhood and developmentally disabled services.
The state is also slashing the budgets of community colleges and the California State University system which serve workingclass students, a majority of whom are women. And, a campaign to vilify public workers and their hard-earned pensions threatens the well-being of those lucky enough to have jobs.

  • Switch the priorities: Tax the Rich and Corporations!

Welfare moms have long been a Republican target as a symbol of “Big Government.” But the hack-and-slash mayhem emanating from Sacramento now is Democrat-led. With the June special election eliminated, the Governor will be looking for ways to address the remaining deficit. More budget cuts are likely, possibly totaling as much as $12.5 billion. Once again, workers and the poor will pay and pay and pay. All this because neither party will call for big business to pay its fair share!
The deficit exists in large measure because corporations and banks are paying less and less into the system. Wealth is being transferred from the working class to the richest few.

  • It’s time to reverse the flow!
  • Enact an oil severance tax California, where Chevron is headquartered, is the only state in the entire world that doesn’t tax extraction (a 9.9% tax = $1.2 bil./yr.)
  • Close corporate tax loopholes ($3-5 bil./yr.)
  • Eliminate war expenditures (CA share = $14.5 bil./yr.). U.S. Out of Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya!
  • Reduce prison spending Release all women incarcerated for defending themselves and their children from their abusers; cancel the Three Strikes law.
  • Stop privatization and contracting out; use union labor ($34 bil./yr.)
  • Reinstate the top income tax bracket to 11% ($4 bil./yr.)

We demand the State restore social services regardless of immigration status; expand CalWORKs, provide childcare & job training!

Issued by: Sisters United Front for Survival (A project of Radical Women) 415-864-1278, baradicalwomen@earthlink.net, http://www.radicalwomen.org


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Silver Tsunami Alert: A Boomer Wave is Coming, and San Francisco is not Prepared

Silver Tsunami

Rejecting the Governator’s transparent attempt to balance a bungled budget on the backs of students, children, people with psychiatric diagnoses, and elders, Californians voted down six of his May 19 Special Election Predatory Props, including 1D and 1E, that targeted youth and people who use and need our communities’ mental health services.

Nonetheless, elders and people with disabilities are still simultaneously whacked by Federal, state, and City budget cuts.

Faced with a $575 million budget shortfall—proportionately worse than the state’s—San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom is trying Arnold’s gambit: During an economic downturn when Federal and state funds are needed most, he’s slashing Department of Public Health services to San Francisco’s most vulnerable people in order to balance his budget.

You didn’t read in the pro-Newsom Chronicle that Tuesday, May 12, at 10:30 a.m., almost 700 elders, folks with disabilities, and supporters baked in the Civic Center sun under the Mayor’s office window protesting the budget cuts. This was the Silver Tsunami.

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